Greek “Nachos” with Feta Drizzle


As many of you know, I participate in the Food Matters Project. Here’s how it works. “Each week, one member of the group chooses a recipe from the book. This member is the “host” for the week. The group cooks the selected dish, and everyone posts their take on the recipe on their own blogs on Monday. The host includes the full recipe in his or her post, and the rest of the group links to the host’s blog for the recipe. Then, everyone heads over here and adds their own links as comments, so we can see how everyone fared!” (from the Project website)
So, this week I’m supposed to post my take on Mark Bittman’s recipe for Greek “Nachos” with Feta Drizzle from the Food Matters Cookbook.

When I read the recipe, I mulled over as many different variations as I could think of. Should I make it with a different cultural focus? a Canadian version? (what exactly is that, anyway?) with West Coast flare? And then, as I read the recipe again, I decided that I really wanted to make it just as is. I had my own mint, tomatoes and cucumber growing in my garden, olives, feta and yogurt in the frig, and red onion in the pantry. All I needed was some pitas.

Problem solved. I decided to simply follow the recipe as written in the book this week, because it looks so good, like something we would love. So here it is, unedited from Mark Bittman’s Food Matters Cookbook, p. 75

  • 4 pitas, split and cut into wedges
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, plus more as needed
  • salt
  • 4 ounces feta cheese
  • 1/2 cup yogurt, preferably Greek or whole milk
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint
  • grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • black pepper
  • 2 or 3 ripe tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cucumber, peeled, seeded and chopped
  • 1/2 cup kalamata olives, pitted and halved
  • 1 small red onion, halved and thinly sliced

Directions
1. Heat the oven to 350 F. Arrange the pita wedges in one layer on baking sheets and brush or drizzle with oil if you like. Bake, turning as needed, until they begin to color, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle with salt, turn off the oven and put the chips back in the oven to keep warm.
2. Combine the feta, yogurt, 1/4 cup oil, mint, and lemon zest and juice in a food processor; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Process until smooth (or use a fork to combine the ingredients in a bowl).
3. Put the chips on a serving plate. Top with the tomatoes, cucumber olives and red onion and drizzle with the feta-yogurt sauce.

I was right. We loved it. Hope you do too.
Megan is our host this week. Check out her recipe on her dreamy blog, Art by Megan and head over here to view the other participants’ takes on this recipe. It is always worth the click!

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About joinmefordinner

. . . living in the Cowichan Valley, cooking for my appreciative family and friends, and taking advantage of all this area has to offer including local organic produce, cheese, wine, artisan breads, and fresh-caught seafood.
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7 Responses to Greek “Nachos” with Feta Drizzle

  1. I am having major garden envy over here!

  2. Lexi says:

    Oh Elaine, your garden is fantastic!

  3. sandra says:

    How wonderful that you could simply lean down and pick your ingredients. I am so jealous.

    • We built a new home last summer, and this is the first year I’ve been able to have a garden for years. At our last house we were ravaged by deer and shade. Here we have a fence, and sunshine! I am in seventh heaven being able to grow my own food.

  4. prairiesummers says:

    I love your garden! mine is a jungle after being gone for 6 weeks haha. I enjoyed the recipe!

  5. Margarita says:

    Hmmm… Incredibly jealous of your garden. Wow… You are so lucky to have all that space and the green thumb! Your presentation is gorgeous,as always!

  6. Loved that you used everything from your garden! Sounds perfectly delicious. This was a fantastic choice- although I made a different variation, we tend do make these once in a while. Anything Greek is great!

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